2-spook:

this picture annoys me so much because they just edited some images of rain over a picture that was taken on a sunny day.

An the scale’s all wrong. That rain is HUGE.

2-spook:

this picture annoys me so much because they just edited some images of rain over a picture that was taken on a sunny day.

An the scale’s all wrong. That rain is HUGE.

(Source: hifuckme)

clockworkgate:

biscuitsarenice:

We Can’t Get Out Of The Bedroom Now.

Shirley Maclaine on Parkinson in 1975

Holy crap.

2-spook:

are you even real

It only gets worse. You wouldn’t think it was possible, but.

2-spook:

are you even real

It only gets worse. You wouldn’t think it was possible, but.

(Source: petsarebest)

gracestealingmandyangel:

xanniesworld:

fuckyeahwomenprotesting:

burdened-with-glorious-puns:

earth-oddity:

2000 was almost 14 years ago
2000 was almost 14 years ago
2000 was almost 14 years ago

there are high schoolers who were born in the 2000s.

I REPEAT: THERE ARE HIGH SCHOOLERS WHO WERE BORN IN 2000.

I feel like our generation doesn’t know how to handle aging. Like anyone born before 1998 is just like nope. 

Pretty much.

…I was born before 1990…what does that mean for us older ones?

Bitches, you have no idea.

(Source: deathstarke)

THAT’S RIGHT! YOU HEARD ME! I AM SUPER FIERCE! MY HAIR DEFIES PHYSICS! I DON’T KNOW WHY I AM SO ANGRY!
BE AFRAID!
(via yukihos, by way of hiyonikki13)

THAT’S RIGHT! YOU HEARD ME! I AM SUPER FIERCE! MY HAIR DEFIES PHYSICS! I DON’T KNOW WHY I AM SO ANGRY!

BE AFRAID!

(via yukihos, by way of hiyonikki13)

benito-cereno:

benito-cereno:

Mythursday: Be Aware of the Ides of March
Okay, so:
I know I said I was going to twice weekly updates to cover the story of Theseus, but I was away from home all day Tuesday this week, and I suddenly find myself short on time today, and worse, I find myself forced to make the decision to do something topical rather than the obviously timeless story of Theseus.
Today is March 15, which, as many of you may know, is the Ides of March, the day on which Gaius Julius Caesar was assassinated in 44 BCE. But what ARE the Ides of March? This is what I thought I would answer today. Admittedly, this is not a mythology topic, but Romanhistoryandcultursday isn’t quite as snappy.
Here is what you need to know:
Romans didn’t think of dates the same way we do. They would never say, “Oh, we’ll go down to Brundisium on April 7th. Can’t wait!” Every date was named based on its relation to a particular landmark day in the month. The three landmarks were the Kalends, the Nones, and the Ides.
How were these days determined? Most likely by the lunar cycle. No one can say for sure, but it is incredibly likely that the original Roman calendar was lunar in nature. The Kalends, then, as the first day of every month, were the day of the new moon. (The name Kalends most likely derives from the Greek “kaleo,” meaning to announce, as in “to announce the new moon.” It is, as you may have guessed, the source of our word calendar.)
And so the Nones are the day of the half moon and the Ides the day of the full moon (Macrobius states that the name Ides comes from an Estruscan word meaning to divide, as in to divide the month in half, but more likely it is related to a Sanskrit word meaning to shine, as the full moon). Originally the dates of these days would vary, being determined by someone who is looking super closely at the moon, but eventually they were regulated so that the Nones fell on the fifth of each month (except for March, May, July and October, when they fell on the seventh) and the Ides fell on the thirteenth of each month (except for March, May, July and October, when they fell on the fifteenth).
Why do they change? It has to do with the lunar cycle and how it doesn’t complete itself in full days. Moving the Ides had more or less the same purpose as leap years, except for the moon, rather than the sun. When the Ides move, the Nones move, because the Nones (from the word for “ninth”) are the ninth day before the Ides.
“But wait!” I hear you cry. “I don’t know much about math learnin’, but I know thirteen minus five is eight, not nine!” Yes, well, here is the next trick: Roman counting was inclusive, meaning if you’re counting backwards from today, you include today. So Tuesday would be considered the third day before Thursday, not two days before as we would count it today.
With me so far?
The other thing you have to understand is that Roman dates always looked forward, never backwards, as they were always looking forward to the next phase of the moon (presumably). So you would never say, “Meet me the day after the Ides,” but rather, “Meet me the Nth day before the Kalends.”
So while today is the Ides of March, tomorrow wouldn’t be reckoned the day after the Ides, it instead would be called ante diem XVII Kalendas Apriles, or the seventeenth day before the Kalends of April. (It would not, in fact, be called this, as in the Roman calendar, March did not have thirty-one days, but don’t worry about that part.)
Surprising no one, it is actually a little more complicated than this once you account for intercalary months, but that is something you can look up on your own if you are interested. Needless to say, there is a reason there have been a couple of major calendar reforms since the original Roman calendar.
(One of these major reforms was made by Julius Caesar himself: it’s called the Julian calendar. Since he began it and his heir Augustus finished instituting it, the months of July and August were renamed after those dudes.)
(Also! Ironically, due to the reforms of Julius Caesar himself, we are commemorating his death on the wrong day. While the Ides of March by pre-Julian reckoning would in fact have been March 15, the day on which Caesar was actually assassinated would be March 14 by our current method. THINGS THAT MAKE YOU GO HMMM.)
It is worth noting that the Ides were the days on which teachers were paid each month. Just, you know, just pointing that out.
Also, it’s a good day for stabbing your friend in the groin until he dies, but only if he has just been named dictator-for-life and your other friends really egg you on about it, playing on your sense of honor and the fact that you are the descendant of your culture’s most famous tyrannicide. ONLY IF YOU MEET ALL THOSE CONDITIONS.
Otherwise, don’t stab any groins.

In anticipation of tomorrow, a post outlining the proper celebration of Groin Stabbing Day

"While the Ides of March by pre-Julian reckoning would in fact have been March 15, the day on which Caesar was actually assassinated would be March 14 by our current method… )
Well today just made a lot more sense.

benito-cereno:

benito-cereno:

Mythursday: Be Aware of the Ides of March

Okay, so:

I know I said I was going to twice weekly updates to cover the story of Theseus, but I was away from home all day Tuesday this week, and I suddenly find myself short on time today, and worse, I find myself forced to make the decision to do something topical rather than the obviously timeless story of Theseus.

Today is March 15, which, as many of you may know, is the Ides of March, the day on which Gaius Julius Caesar was assassinated in 44 BCE. But what ARE the Ides of March? This is what I thought I would answer today. Admittedly, this is not a mythology topic, but Romanhistoryandcultursday isn’t quite as snappy.

Here is what you need to know:

Romans didn’t think of dates the same way we do. They would never say, “Oh, we’ll go down to Brundisium on April 7th. Can’t wait!” Every date was named based on its relation to a particular landmark day in the month. The three landmarks were the Kalends, the Nones, and the Ides.

How were these days determined? Most likely by the lunar cycle. No one can say for sure, but it is incredibly likely that the original Roman calendar was lunar in nature. The Kalends, then, as the first day of every month, were the day of the new moon. (The name Kalends most likely derives from the Greek “kaleo,” meaning to announce, as in “to announce the new moon.” It is, as you may have guessed, the source of our word calendar.)

And so the Nones are the day of the half moon and the Ides the day of the full moon (Macrobius states that the name Ides comes from an Estruscan word meaning to divide, as in to divide the month in half, but more likely it is related to a Sanskrit word meaning to shine, as the full moon). Originally the dates of these days would vary, being determined by someone who is looking super closely at the moon, but eventually they were regulated so that the Nones fell on the fifth of each month (except for March, May, July and October, when they fell on the seventh) and the Ides fell on the thirteenth of each month (except for March, May, July and October, when they fell on the fifteenth).

Why do they change? It has to do with the lunar cycle and how it doesn’t complete itself in full days. Moving the Ides had more or less the same purpose as leap years, except for the moon, rather than the sun. When the Ides move, the Nones move, because the Nones (from the word for “ninth”) are the ninth day before the Ides.

“But wait!” I hear you cry. “I don’t know much about math learnin’, but I know thirteen minus five is eight, not nine!” Yes, well, here is the next trick: Roman counting was inclusive, meaning if you’re counting backwards from today, you include today. So Tuesday would be considered the third day before Thursday, not two days before as we would count it today.

With me so far?

The other thing you have to understand is that Roman dates always looked forward, never backwards, as they were always looking forward to the next phase of the moon (presumably). So you would never say, “Meet me the day after the Ides,” but rather, “Meet me the Nth day before the Kalends.”

So while today is the Ides of March, tomorrow wouldn’t be reckoned the day after the Ides, it instead would be called ante diem XVII Kalendas Apriles, or the seventeenth day before the Kalends of April. (It would not, in fact, be called this, as in the Roman calendar, March did not have thirty-one days, but don’t worry about that part.)

Surprising no one, it is actually a little more complicated than this once you account for intercalary months, but that is something you can look up on your own if you are interested. Needless to say, there is a reason there have been a couple of major calendar reforms since the original Roman calendar.

(One of these major reforms was made by Julius Caesar himself: it’s called the Julian calendar. Since he began it and his heir Augustus finished instituting it, the months of July and August were renamed after those dudes.)

(Also! Ironically, due to the reforms of Julius Caesar himself, we are commemorating his death on the wrong day. While the Ides of March by pre-Julian reckoning would in fact have been March 15, the day on which Caesar was actually assassinated would be March 14 by our current method. THINGS THAT MAKE YOU GO HMMM.)

It is worth noting that the Ides were the days on which teachers were paid each month. Just, you know, just pointing that out.

Also, it’s a good day for stabbing your friend in the groin until he dies, but only if he has just been named dictator-for-life and your other friends really egg you on about it, playing on your sense of honor and the fact that you are the descendant of your culture’s most famous tyrannicide. ONLY IF YOU MEET ALL THOSE CONDITIONS.

Otherwise, don’t stab any groins.

In anticipation of tomorrow, a post outlining the proper celebration of Groin Stabbing Day

"While the Ides of March by pre-Julian reckoning would in fact have been March 15, the day on which Caesar was actually assassinated would be March 14 by our current method… )

Well today just made a lot more sense.

unfortunatesneeze:

Self-Positive Sailor Moon part 2

I love you, Internet.

(Source: cherries-jubilee)

nevver:

David Shrigley

thefaceofbro:

Never do anything ironically, it eventually turns into something you just do.

HEED.

2-spook:

Just in case

I appreciate when a man ensures my pleasure. ACHIEVEMENT UNLOCKED.

Yes, precisely.

(Source: owlturdcomix)

iamtonysexual:

jonandtheon:

jonandtheon:

jonandtheon:

MY BOOK IS LOCKED IN A CLASSROOMN

RED ASLERT

I TOLD THIS REALLY NICE KID WHO NEVER CAUSES TROUBLE AND HEREACHED INTO HIS BACKPACK AND PULLED OUT A KEYCHAIN WITH KEYS TO THE CLASSROOM AND UNLOCKED IT FOR ME??

update i asked him why he had those keys and he said “its not important” im so lost

He’ll be vital to your quest later, don’t forget about him.

OBSERVE. COLLECT CLUES. REPORT BACK.

(Source: cccharlesxavier)

won83:

박신혜

I’m not saying that Park Shin-hye is an android designed by Korean scientists to push the outer limits of the Turing test. I’m just saying that she’s never had chapped lips in her whole life. 

won83:

박신혜

I’m not saying that Park Shin-hye is an android designed by Korean scientists to push the outer limits of the Turing test. I’m just saying that she’s never had chapped lips in her whole life. 

(Source: squid-chip)

Just passing on wisdom to the next generation, like old ladies do. 
Remember when you were a kid and people vomited their love for you all over you all the time, whether you wanted them to or not? And you rolled your eyes and were like: omg whatever. My family is filled with weird dorks. 
You didn’t know it, but even that only makes them love you MORE.

Just passing on wisdom to the next generation, like old ladies do. 

Remember when you were a kid and people vomited their love for you all over you all the time, whether you wanted them to or not? And you rolled your eyes and were like: omg whatever. My family is filled with weird dorks. 

You didn’t know it, but even that only makes them love you MORE.